RECORD/SINGLE/VIDEO REVIEWS

***Reviews begin with "The Spiders We Eat" EP, and then continue with earlier records. 

MusicExistence.com

The Mailman’s Children; Release Hot New Video (“Ride In Your Mind”)

Posted: Jan, 2016

“…The band completely mesmerize by the time it’s over. It’s a momentum thing and they’ve got it down with great songwriting. And there are no moods swings to deal with, as it holds a steady pace. The main drive comes from vocalist Labossiere, and that is always a testament because the backing track usually comes first. His ability to make it sound built around the vocals is a remarkable thing.” – Scott Prinzing

 

MusicPerk

"The Spiders We Eat...is an unexpected gem. The vocals, intense and impassioned, and the songwriting, clever and insightful, alone make this EP worth listening to. An EP that flows; the transition from one song to the next is effortless and the vocals are transformative!"
8 out of 10*** - Pooja S.

GasHouseRadio.com

The Mailman’s Children release new video: “Ride In Your Mind”

Posted: Jan 5, 2016

“…Eric Labossiere is somewhere between a rock crooner and singer/songwriter approach, which cuts like a knife even though it’s reasonably quiet. This guy is great, no question about it but the other band members are equally gifted. There is a balance between them which is completely unforced. No rushing going on with this group…There is plenty here to enjoy for both the rock lovers and the acoustic and even folk/Americana lovers…” – Sebastian Cole/SP CLARK, GashouseRadio.co

 

ReviewYou.com

Review: The Mailman’s Children, The Spiders We Eat

Jan 16, 2015

2015 marks the 15th anniversary of The Mailman’s Children, a Canadian/American alternative rock/indie rock band that was formed in 2000 and debuted with their album, Maritime Sun, that year.  The Mailman’s Children are often described as Canadian/American because they have a connection to both the U.S.’ Upper Midwest and Central Canada: frontman Eric Labossiere was born in Canada but now lives in Montana, while the other members of the band (including Joel Perreault on lead guitar and background vocals, Joel Couture on bass and Eddie Vesely or Ivan Burke on drums) are all based in Winnipeg in the Canadian province of Manitoba.  The Mailman’s Children have a history of bringing quality songs to alternative rock and indie rock, and they are in good form on their five-track EP, The Spiders We Eat (it should be noted that Burke, their touring drummer, plays drums on this EP, although Vesely is still part of the band).

There are only four songs on this 2014 recording/early 2015 release: “Private Room,” “Ride in Your Mind,” “Humility” and “Off to Work.”  But “Ride in Your Mind” is heard twice: there is both an electric version and an acoustic version.  The electric version rocks a bit harder than the acoustic version, yet when the two versions of “Ride in Your Mind” are heard side by side, it speaks volumes about the musical outlook of the Mailman’s Children.  Some alternative rockers and indie rockers will try to use attitude, electricity and aggression to grab the listener’s attention, but this is an EP that thrives on quality songwriting above all else.  Songcraft is the name of the game on “Ride in Your Mind” as well as “Humility,” “Private Room” and “Off to Work.”  So whether “Ride in Your Mind” is heard in a stripped down acoustic setting or a more amplified electric setting, it still jumps out as an example of good, sincere, honest-to-God songcraft.   The Mailman’s Children don’t need electricity to win over listeners: they do that with the quality of their songs.  And Labossiere continues to be an expressive frontman.  From “Private Room” to “Humility” to the two versions of “Ride in Your Mind,” Labossiere never has a problem getting his points across emotionally.

The direct or indirect alternative rock and indie rock influences that have served The Mailman’s Children well in the past continue to serve them well on The Spiders We Eat, and those influences range from the Smiths and the Replacements to the Goo Goo Dolls, Counting Crows, the Gin Blossoms and the Tragically Hip.   In other words, the Mailman’s Children get much of their creative inspiration from melodic bands that ruled alternative rock and indie rock in the 1980s and 1990s.  But one of the people the Mailman’s Children have cited as an influence is a Baby Boomer icon who became a superstar in the 1970s: Billy Joel.  Perhaps Billy Joel isn’t the first person a casual listener would think of while checking out “Off to Work,” “Humility” or “Private Room,” but someone who pays really close attention while listening to those songs could see why the Mailman’s Children would consider Joel an influence.  Alternative rock and indie rock are not things that came out of a test tube in a laboratory back in the day; many Baby Boomer artists who emerged in the 1960s and 1970s helped to pave the way for the alt-rock and indie rock artists who emerged in the 1980s and 1990s.  Counting Crows and the Gin Blossoms certainly had 1960s and 1970s influences; so did the Replacements and the Goo Goo Dolls.  Bearing those things in mind, it makes perfect sense that the Mailman’s Children would cite Billy Joel as one of their influences.  Labossiere and his colleagues obviously appreciate solid pop-rock songwriting regardless of whether the artist is part of the Baby Boom Generation or Generation X.  And that appreciation works to their creative advantage on tunes like “Ride in Your Mind” and “Humility.”

Keeping a band together for 15 years is not easy.  But the pleasing The Spiders We Eat makes one glad that the Mailman’s Children have hung in there and stuck to their alternative rock/indie rock guns.

- Alex Henderson
3.5 stars out of 5

 

ReviewYou.com, Single Reviews

The Mailman’s Children, “Ride In Your Mind”

Posted: Jan 30, 2015

"Where The Mailman’s Children takes us here is melancholic escapism; a musical escape more appropriate to the day.  Love it or hate the song, respect is due to The Mailman’s Children." 

- Wildy Haskell

REVIEW YOU.com

Posted  June 27, 2013

Artist: The Mailman's Children

Album: Supply & Demand EP

The Mailman’s Children are a veteran “North American” rock band based out of both Winnipeg, Canada and Minneapolis, Minnesota.  TMC, as they are affectionate dubbed by their fans, formed in 2000 and released two well-received studio albums before going on a lengthy hiatus.  Marking their highly-anticipated return is Supply & Demand, their new EP and third studio recording overall, which is due to be self-released in July.  The four-piece band is led by songwriter, lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist Eric Labossiere along with lead guitarist Joel Perreault and the super-tight rhythm section of bassist Joel Couture and drummer Eddie Vesely.  Collectively, they create a catchy and diverse brand of alternative rock that harkens back to the guitar-driven College Rock of the late 80’s and 90’s and touches on elements of the classic and progressive rock of the 70’s, all while retaining a modern edge on the new EP which was co-produced by John Paul Peters (Propagandhi, Royal Canoe) and Eric Labossiere.       

The bouncy, Reggae-tinged rhythm and instantly hummable guitar melody of “Undercover” opens the EP on a high note, along with a soaring chorus that offers up Labossiere's impassioned plea to warn someone of the danger they’re blindly walking into.  “Crazy Without It” follows and features Vesely’s intriguing drum sound that switches back and forth between shuffling electronics and a more natural, pounding drum beat along with Couture’s strutting bass line that lay the foundation for the super-poppy guitar and vocal melodies to set the song apart as a standout moment.  Showcasing another side of their strong songwriting is the dynamic, progressive rock undertones of “Do You Wanna Be Right” with its driving, funk-fuelled rock rhythm which opens up just enough to allow space for Perreault’s melodic classic rock-styled guitar runs a chance to grab the spotlight.  As a change of pace, the band slows down the pace a little with the ballad-esque “Walls Have Ears” and its mesmerizing cyclical acoustic guitar patterns and layers of lush vocal harmonies.  Another standout track, “Anger At Its Best” recalls the almighty Canadian rock institution Rush with its bass-led groove, intricate fretwork and stop/start time signatures.  What makes it truly standout is the track’s big, arena-filling sing-along chorus.  Closing out the six-song EP is “Lately” and its crunchy guitar tone and head-nodding rhythm that leave you wanting more, especially after such a long hiatus.  Each individual song from the collection adds brushstrokes to the overall portrait of the band, painting a picture of a band that is confident, creative and skilled in their ability.          

Although it is sort of short, Supply & Demand, the appropriately-titled new EP from The Mailman’s Children is a welcome return for the band, which gives their fans just enough songs to restock the supply, but that only heightens the demand even more for a proper full-length release.  Now, I’m not an economist or anything but I do know good songs when I hear them and TMC delivers the goods on their latest EP.       

Review by: Justin Kreitzer

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Reviewyou.com 

USA

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MUSIC NEWS NASHVILLE.com

MUSIC NEWS TORONTO.com

Both Sources Posted Same Review October 7, 2013

Artist: The Mailman's Children

Album: Supply & Demand

The Mailman's Children is a 4 piece band from Canada (Winnipeg, Manitoba). Canada can sometimes be a very beautiful place and it has its fair share of unpredictable cold and snowy days as well.  However, this might just be the perfect locale to explore the unpredictable realm of musical expression.

This latest CD from The Mailman's Children "Supply and Demand" delivers all of the above and will reveal all the a-typical conventions of today's modern alt-rock music that so many enjoy here in the US.  The band which features Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vox, Rhythm Guitars) has done a good job at creating a solid sonic space for the listener to bask in.  The first track "Undercover" lifts off the ground smoothly and is in itself an impressive kickoff statement to say the least.  It's remarkably easy to listen, and gravitated me right away like a magnet.

All songs present a stunning collection of music that effectively runs the gamut and has much to offer insofar as impressive music and captivating vocals from LaBossiere.  Musical comparables to me include The Fray, Bright Eyes, Thriving Ivory and Broken Social Scene.  One cannot help but admire artists with strong songwriting skills and truthful conviction all the while demonstrating a strong level of creativity.  One senses a growing ambition as this CD advances.  LaBossiere and his crew demonstrate apealing guitar and vocals that really hit the mark with intellectually stimulating lyrics.

The musicianship is rock steady and the overall production value tows the line.  All in all a great set of songs. Speaking of which notable standouts for me include:  "Undercover," "Crazy Without It" and "Walls Have Ears."  If you want a melodic rocking staple there's something on this record for you.  Obviously many will fall head over heals with "The Mailman's Children" here in the US.  This is one band set up rather well for mainstream success in Canada and beyond this year.  Some of this plays into strong marketability potential worldwide.  Some songs present more modern sounding overtones but despite all this the flavor possesses traditional Rock N' Roll textures with some Americana Pop thrown in.

This is really what makes The Mailman's Children so enticing to me personally.  The Mailman's Children possesses an impressive and youthful look and sound.  "Supply and Demand" grants one rare access to peer into the soul of a quintessential artist not so tormented and rather easy going and positive shall we say.

Rating = 9 out of 10***

Review by Blaine Calhoun

MUSIC NEWS NASHVILLE.com

Nashville, USA

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INDIE MUSIC DIGEST - Seattle, WA, USA

Album title: “Supply & Demand”

Review released May 13, 2013

* * * * * * * * * out of 10* (9 out of 10 stars)

 

Genre: Ambient Rock, Alternative Rock, Ambient Pop

Sounds Like: Radiohead, Live, Death Cab for Cutie, Kings of Leon, Better than Ezra. 

Technical Grade: 8/10

Production/Musicianship Grade: 9/10

Commercial Value: 8/10

Overall Talent Level: 8/10

Songwriting Skills: 9/10

Performance Skill: 9/10

Best Songs: Undercover, Crazy Without It 

Weakness:  Short Sided CD

The CD kicks things off with Track 1, “Undercover,” a rock steady prelude of sorts that serves up methodical musical ambience, driving rock rhythm and emotional vocal delivery from Labossiere. Track 2, “Crazy Without It,” serves up an impressive follow-up statement that dishes out melodic phrasing, painted against dynamic musical flow and an impressive culmination of guitar, voice and harmonies for a grand slam chorus. Track 3, “Do You Wanna be Right,” keeps things moving with heartfelt vocal delivery, via well placed rhythm guitar and thought-provoking lyrical content that flows and ebbs its way through to emotional fruition. As the CD quickly unfolds I can hear influences ranging from Radiohead, Live, Death Cab for Cutie and even Kings of Leon to Better than Ezra. The music has everything you would expect from a dynamic Alternative/Progressive Rock CD, but also touches Straight-up Rock that’s quite dynamic and melodic. The style of the music is highly original and refuses to be pinned down the first listen. The vocals are impressive, compelling and push the emotional envelope and imagination. The rhythm guitar ambience is spot on, very melodic and dynamic and the vocal phrasing and musical flow are highly creative. I didn’t fail to notice a few impressive guitar solos layered along the way.  Rather impressive guitar as well. The overall vocal style from Labossiere works extremely well with the confine of this progressive rock catalogue and his melodic phrasing and lyrics are effective. By track 4 the CD hits solid stride dishing out many impressive songs in a row. Like a heavy weight boxer the songs keep coming at you one after the other - with no sign of letting up. From heartfelt “Walls Have Ears” to grooving “Anger At Its Best” this CD pretty much has something for just about everyone. The CD ends with Track 6, “Lately,” the perfect finale statement for a CD of this caliber.

CD is a bit short with its 6 song line-up. Perhaps 4-5 more tracks are needed to make it a fully loaded CD line up. I'm not a fan of the title of the CD. Not so sure I get the message with respect to its overall theme and how it applies to this catalogue of music either.

This latest release from The Mailman’s Children is a strong and consistent musical statement from start to finish. Its strength – the strong song for song consistency, progressive dynamics and strong melodic structure that keeps coming at you. The music is catchy, melodic, and highly original. What else can I say?

Cyrus Rhodes

INDIE MUSIC DIGEST

Seattle, USA

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A REVIEW by Alec Cunningham

“Supply & Demand” EP by TMC (The Mailman’s Children)

June 27, 2013

After a short break, The Mailman's Children, which hails from both America and Canada, have now released its third studio album titled Supply And Demand.  A total of six tracks can be found on this third release, the first one being a track titled "Undercover." There is a common factor visible within each of these songs. It is not that they are all written about the same subject matter necessarily; it is that they are each written in the same style. Their lyrics carry a distinct vagueness to them from the get go. Although they supply listeners with engaging lyrics they leave a bit of mystery to them, never quite spelling out the true meaning behind the track.

Similar to the first track, "Crazy Without It" carries a similar elusiveness to it. The final verse, however, has something to say about the title that was chosen for this group's album. Lead singer and author of all of the lyrics that can be found throughout the album, Eric Labossiere sings, "Supply & demand sometimes they don’t see eye to eye. Your supply, my demand, sometimes we don’t see eye to eye." Even the album's artwork, which illustrates a button designated for deploying a missile, seems to be based off of the lyrics of this track in which he compares himself to a testing site with someone else inside the control center.

There is one track that delves a bit deeper and allows listeners a more in-depth look at its meaning. This specific track is "Do You Wanna Be Right," a song about not wanting to be like someone whose actions are centered on the hopes of gaining fortune and fame. There is something much more poetic and witty about the lines of this track compared to the previous ones, though the lyrics of those are skillfully composed as well. This is especially true with the lines, "A walk where no one follows is just a walk, a long long walk alone. Cause people, they leave people – you always reminded me of that."

"Walls Have Ears" is a softer track that takes each line at a slower pace. The song is in response to a female who writes the narrator off as simply the reason her clothes are on the floor. The narrator, however, banters back saying that sex is not the only factor in their relationship and that she must feel the same way as him. The song increases in tension as it reaches the end as a single line is repeated until the conclusion. For a song with the word "Anger" in its title you would think "Anger At Its Best" would be a heavier, more uncontrolled track. But in reality, complete with its vocal harmonies and an all-around melodic structure, it is one that is quite the opposite. Supply And Demand seems to revolve around two people who are conducting ongoing attempts of protecting themselves from one another. "Lately" is the final piece of the puzzle given to listeners. The narrator finally fully admits his desire to convert his current friendship into a true relationship.

Although their sound falls into the rock category there is more to them than just that. Their music is never too hard, yet never too soft either; it's a sound falls into a happy medium that makes sense for them as a group. Guitar, bass, and drum could be used to describe practically any genre imaginable, but when tambourine, keys, and shakers are added to the mix as has been done here the sound becomes much more specific and characterized. Only if you are truly poetically inclined will you understand the meaning of some of these lines. They are not the kind that become clear after a single listen; instead they are the type that are thoughtfully prepared and written by their author in the hopes of captivating and compelling listeners into the world that has been created within Supply And Demand. Take the time to step into the world The Mailman's Children have created; you might find that you enjoy it.

Review by Alec Cunningham

Rating: 4 stars (out of 5)

USA

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MUSIC EMISSIONS (USA)

Album title:  “SUPPLY & DEMAND”

Review released May 15, 2013

3.5 out of 5 stars 

Some letter carriers, they get around I tell you...how else can you explain Midwest prairie rockers The Mailman's Children? Their smooth-singing frontman, Eric Labossiere, receives his packages in Minneapolis, Minnesota, while the rhythmic portion of the band is posted just over 450 miles northwest in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Regardless of the distance between them, they deliver on new album “Supply & Demand” as if all four members grew up on the same street. That is to say there is a tightness and intimacy throughout all six songs which warrant repeated listens - You could say this EP is essential audio accompaniment to any prolonged road trip. The Mailman's Children seem to have a real versatility to them (Must have something to do with that ‘through rain sleet and snow' creedo!)

They definitely fall under the "rock" umbrella, although there are echoes of numerous complementary subgenres on this compact recording like prog, post-grunge and even country on opener "Undercover" that add to what should be a wide appeal. Labossiere's name may be of French origin, but I find he belts out lyrics with a slight English accent, not to mention a hint of '80s charm. "Anger at its Best" has a killer guitar solo to go along with his consistently soothing voice. It isn't actually all that angry, but you can genuinely feel Labossiere's passion and anguish, especially on the previous track "Walls Have Ears" when he pleads how he wants more...and more is what you're going to want from this group; Supply & Demand is their first release since 2006 following a bit of a hiatus. Here's hoping the rocketship and jolly, candy-like button artwork is an indication The Mailman's Children are ready to push their limits and blast off into new music horizons!

Gilles Leblanc  A.K.A. “Rockthusiast”

Music Emissions

USA

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SKOPE MAG.com  - Boston, MA, USA

“Supply & Demand” by The Mailman’s Children

June 11, 2013

This 4 piece Alternative Rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba call themselves Mailman’s Children. Their latest release: Supply and Demand is sure to be remembered as one of the more remembered modern Alternative Rock-Pop releases of our time from Canada. It’s pure College Rock the way it used to be via full-tilt of playing, hooky grooves and a top tiered sound. It’s the ultimate in musical intoxication. Before I get to the review let me first say Mailmans Children will take you back to a simpler, happier more carefree time. A time before artists started hanging out the dirty laundry to dry on the radio. That felt good to say!

This band opens with “Undercover” a crisp fast paced number with guitar, drums, bass, and solid vocals from lead singer Eric LaBossiere. “Crazy Witout It” takes it to another level with its classic alt-rock vibe, perfect for full tilt club atmosphere. The 3rd track “Do You Wanna Be Right” lets it all hang out with catchy vibe, fun musical landscape full of power and intrigue. One thing that impressed me about this album/band is the attention to detail, there is an ambience that really sucks in the listener into their musical world – very professional. The instrumentation and tones give you that genuine feel of good music and writing from a generation ago, it has a solid feel reminiscent of music popular in the mid nineties. These cats remind me of a modern day version of Violent Femmes. All members are solid visually, musically and give off a youthful spirit. . Band members include: Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo Guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vox, Rhythm Guitars).In many ways LaBossiere is the strongest card in Mailman’s Children mailbag. Supply and Demand captures the youthful spirit of indie-rock scene which will ring true not only for older more experienced listeners but new ones as well. This latest release from Mailman’s Children wraps up a well rounded and interesting cross section of classic Alternative Rock, Indie-College -Rock and Psychedelic Pop. Despite this it is accessible to modern day listeners. How is this possible? Only an experienced band can pull it off, backed by a solid producing effort from both musical mastermind Eric Labossiere and JP Peters of Private Ear Recording. Sad to say music like this is sorely missing from the 2013 repertoire. Mailman’s Children is an exception to this rule and does more than fill this musical void. They can hold their own against any hot running band out there right now – especially north of the Border.

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

Posted by Scottie Carlito

SKOPE MAG.com

Boston, USA

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“Supply & Demand” by The Mailman’s Children

POSTED June 27, 2013

ALEX HENDERSON is a veteran journalist/music critic whose work has appeared in Billboard, Spin, The L.A. Weekly, Creem, HITS, Jazziz, JazzTimes, CD Review, Skin Two, Black Radio Exclusive, Thrash Metal and a long list of other well known publications. Known for his eclectic tastes, Alex has contributed several thousand CD reviews to The All Music Guide online and series of reference books since 1996. Jello Biafra, Sonny Rollins, Megadeth, Ice Cube, Live, Chick Corea, Public Enemy, Marduk, Bobby Brown, Ra and Everlast are among the many well known artists Alex has interviewed during his long career

It isn’t often that different members of a band live in different countries, but technically, The Mailman’s Children are both an American band and a Canadian band.  Eric Labossiere, the band’s lead singer, is based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, but the other members of the band (including Joel Perreault on lead guitar and background vocals, Joel Couture on bass and Eddie Vesely on drums) live across the border up in Winnipeg in the Canadian province of Manitoba.  So all of the band members are going to need to keep their passports handy when they perform live.  But the fact that the members of the band come from two different countries obviously is not hurting them musically in any way; their six-song album, Supply and Demand, is an engaging alternative pop-rock/indie rock effort that deserves high marks for both feeling and craftsmanship.

Labossiere is an expressive frontman.  When he sings, Labossiere brings a lot of emotion to the lyrics and melodies he is embracing.  But being an expressive lead singer wouldn’t mean a whole lot if Labossiere did not have strong material to work with, which he does.  The Mailman’s Children have impressive alternative pop-rock and indie rock instincts, and those instincts serve them well on melodic tracks such as “Undercover,” “Anger at Its Best,”

“Do You Wanna Be Right” and “Lately.”  Their melodies and hooks have a way of jumping right out at the listener. 

A variety of influences assert themselves on this release, many of them from the alternative rock realm.  The direct or indirect influences that the Mailman’s Children bring to the table include, among others, the Replacements, Counting Crows, the Tragically Hip, the Goo Goo Dolls, the Smiths and the Gin Blossoms.   All of those artists are known for having a healthy sense of musical craftsmanship, and when one is listening to “Walls Have Ears,” “Undercover” or “Crazy Without It,” it is evident that their influences are serving them well.  And yet, the band’s influences do not begin and end with alternative pop-rock.  They realize that rock music did not start with alternative rock, and the Mailman’s Children have cited Billy Joel as one of their pre-alternative influences.  Listening to “Lately,” “Anger at Its Best” or “Do You Wanna Be Right,” it is not hard to see why the Mailman’s Children would cite Billy Joel as an influence.  Billy Joel always knew how to bring the hooks, and it isn’t hard to find traces of Joel in their writing.  One can easily picture the members of the Mailman’s Children being attracted to Joel hits like “Uptown Girl,” “We Didn’t Start the Fire” and “It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me.”  Billy Joel always did know a thing or two about power pop, and that fact is not lost on the members of the Mailman’s Children.  

Musically, different generations will make their mark in different ways.  But there is no reason why musicians are obligated to be influenced by one generation exclusively; liking a lot of alternative rock artists who are Generation X or Generation Y icons does not mean that one cannot have baby boomer influences as well.  And on Supply and Demand, the influence of Billy Joel is right at home with the influence of the Replacements, the Gin Blossoms and Counting Crows.  The Mailman’s Children know how to take elements of baby boomer rock, blend it with elements of Generation X and Generation Y alternative rock and come up with an attractive mixture.

Supply and Demand doesn’t pretend to be groundbreaking or point alternative pop-rock or indie rock in any new directions.  But if the material is somewhat derivative, it is pleasingly derivative.  It is derivative in a positive sense of the word.  The Mailman’s Children deliver songs that are infectious, nicely constructed and memorable, and Supply and Demand paints a consistently attractive picture of this Canadian/American band from Manitoba by way of Minnesota.

Review by Alex Henderson

4 stars out of 5

USA

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REVIEW OF THE SINGLE “UNDERCOVER” on REVIEW YOU.com

Artist Name: The Mailman’s Children

EP: “Supply & Demand”

Song Title: “Undercover”

Hailing from both Minneapolis, MN, USA and Winnipeg, MB, CANADA, The Mailman’s Children (TMC) delivers with their song, “Undercover” off of their release entitled Supply & Demand. The Mailman’s Children features front-man Eric Labossiere, who lives in America, while Joel Couture (bassist) Joel Perreault (guitarist and backing vocals) and Eddie Vesely (percussion and electronics) reside in Canada. Only a couple hours away from each other, The Mailman’s Children haven’t allowed distance to be a prevalent obstacle in determining their success, consistently pushing TV and radio appearances and tours throughout most of North America. Distance hasn’t hindered The Mailman’s Children nor precluding them from producing solid music, as “Undercover” demonstrates.

The Mailman’s Children easily lands “Undercover” within the pop-rock genre with a heavy emphasis placed upon soft rock influences. Opening the track is a soft underlying bass line combined with a simple drum beat that provides sufficient support for the song to build itself upon. Shortly deeming its entrance is the intricately performed guitar strumming, persisting as one of the track’s highlights. The exceptional guitar performances provide an impeccable environment for Labossiere to assert his soothing vocals that echo of tranquility, yet with a softness that manages to demand attention. The song maintains a relaxed tone, employed throughout the prevalent vocal consistent, striking but never overpowering percussion performance, meticulous guitar playing, and supportive bass. Overall, “Undercover” isn’t a song that is necessarily ground-breaking or significantly unique. However, with its positive atmosphere and relaxed feel, various audiences will find themselves grooving along to The Mailman’s Children’s creation.

The lyricism for “Undercover” exhibits passion and glimpses of hope. While Labossiere delivers “And I wish that I could be there, and I wish that I was leading you to safety,” with devotion and echoes of genuine sincerity, the employed tone is nothing short of authenticity. The lyrics simply click with the conveyed tone, appearing to enhance the sincerity audible through The Mailman’s Children’s instrumental and vocal performances. The arrangement may be of simplicity, but the lyricism evokes an emotional response, showcasing The Mailman’s Children as a band built off of genuineness and originality: both of which are rarities with a multitude of modern artists.

For The Mailman’s Children, “Undercover” may not be something extraordinary, but it certainly is a solid release. The Mailman’s Children step into a musical experience of relaxation, but their demonstrated talent isn’t ignored. “Undercover” reveals The Mailman’s Children as a group of musicians who persist with passion and deliver masterful, intricate performances. There may not be anything earth-shaking with “Undercover”, but for those seeking to delve into sincere music, The Mailman’s Children “Undercover” is the track to listen to.

Review by: Alexa Spieler

Rating: 3.5 stars (out of 5)

USA

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ALLWHATSROCK.com

News: June 12, 2013

Artist: Mailman’s Children

EP: Supply and Demand

Who doesn’t like music from Canada? However I’d bet not all hands go up in the air. I mean, while one might think rock from Canada music might not be your first and foremost musical choice, most people can get into a good Canadian groove and really enjoy well written and performed music from time to time. You know bands like: Rush, Aldo Nova, Saga, Bryan Adams, Bare Naked Ladies, etc, etc. Well, keeping this in mind this new release by Mailman’s Children (Winnipeg, Manitoba) entitled interestingly enough Supply and Demand is an exceptional 6 Track EP and is very multi-dimensional to say the least. It also however possesses a Alternative Pop Rock core accessible by all listeners – even by Progressive Rock fans. Does all of this sound a bit over the top to you? Just listen to marquee tracks like Undercover, Do You Wanna Be Right, and Anger At Its Best and you’ll see my perspective. I got hooked on TMC right away after listening to the first few moments of Undercover. Melding a unique yet accessible blend of unearthly guitars, polyrhythmic beats, tasty groove-ridden bass lines and infectious vocal harmonies, the TMC sound is a testament to how they approach music. This band bridges a diverse audience with its distinguishing sonic vision. What’s more the band: Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo Guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vox, Rhythm Guitars) is spot on and delivers syncopated musical synergy that will blow your mind. Kudos goes out to the amazing rhythm section and catchy melodies. The rhythm section is really a big part of their sound. It adds a sort of a classic rock stigma to the disc, I hate to pigeonhole but if you like The Wildflowers, Robbie Williams, Counting Crows, Hootie and the Blowfish, Muse, and even Interpol you will like the music of TMC. While the main focus of this genre of music is generally the instrumental work, that doesn’t mean that the vocals fall behind here. They never feel like an afterthought. Hence the vocal work from LaBossiere brings it all together. These guys manage to move between the mellower sounds and the more rocking ones all the while being undeniably progressive based. All in all it’s a powerful combination that puts a band like TMC on the map for 2013. They should go a long way towards proving that real music is still alive and well. Supply and Demand is an album that I just can’t recommend enough.

Official Rating: 7/10

Eli Gattis

ALL WHAT’S ROCK.com

USA

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GIG BAND.com

Review released: June 12, 2013

Band/Artist: Mailman’s Children

Album: Supply and Demand (EP)

“Supply and Demand” is their latest release and the result though far from a self-indulgent ego trip, rather a moving and elegiac artistic statement from start to finish. This is not your overly predictable Ramon Noodle “Sing-Songy” Nikelback-esque rock band. None of that here. Instead this band could even be classed as a 3 genera band: Alternative Rock, Pop Rock and even a little Punk. Mailman’s Children have way too much precision and clarity to live in the shadows of overly-predictable Power Pop Rock that’s been flooding the airways lately. Indeed this is clearly evident in songs like “Undercover,” “Anger at its Best” and “Crazy Without It” which methodically ups the ante to a very respectable level of catchy musical craftsmanship and addictive hard rocking melody that transcends pigeonholing. I will also add the music is also commercially viable with a fresh sound and a carefully wielded jagged edge sound that holds the attention span of the listener perfectly. In a nutshell this is a combination of Green Day, Good Charlotte, The Killers and even The White Stripes. “Supply and Demand’ appeals to so many listeners with a wide variety of musical styles – but also packs a powerful punch and provides much needed voice for all the rockers out there who want something more than the status quos.

Favorite track: Undercover

Criticism: None if it’s an EP. If its a CD then it’s way to short.

Conclusion: I would imagine in time we will hear more from these 4 Canucks in the near future. No doubt Mailman’s Children has carved a marketable niche for themselves North of the Border thus far setting them up for marketable success down the road south of the Border. But for now I can honestly say this is one artist that clearly gives you a musical snapshot that is highly original, unique and dare I say dangerous and chaotic in scope. What else can I say? Rock n’ Roll is still alive and kicking in Canada.

MEET THE BAND: Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo Guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vocals, Rhythm Guitars)

Final Rating: 4/5 Stars

Michael Rand

GIG BAND.com

USA

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INDIE ARTISTS ALLIANCE.com

June 12, 2013

Band – Mailman’s Children

Album – Supply and Demand

Let’s be honest for just a second shall we. I get a lot of albums sent my way for review and I mean a lot. Most of them don’t do anything for me. They don’t always get happily placed in the CD player, but the ones that do usually get a three song stay of execution and generally if they last past that they get my full unadulterated attention. Sometimes I’m hooked from the first track, and that’s precisely what happened when I put the latest release Supply and Demand in my CD player by Canadian based Mailman’s Children. The Album bursts to life with the fantastic rocked out sound and follows through with a wonderful sequence of songs, six of them to be exact. It twists and turns the way great albums should with a little bit of rock, a little bit of high octane driven soul and a lot of harmonic goodness. Mailman’s Children are: Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo Guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vox, Rhythm Guitars). I really like to song line up – the way each song masterfully transitions through to the next creating much in the way of drama. So many bands and record labels get this basic skill so wrong. They fail to listen to the songs at their disposal and seemingly throw the album together without giving it any real thought. I’ve known people who work to formulas making sure that their best songs start and finish the album with the remaining tracks squeezed between in a slapdash fashion. That’s not the case with Supply and Demand in fact each track could probably survive on its own merits, but the album just flows so well. Mailman’s Children could easily be heralded as classic sounding funk-jazz-rock but there is so much more to them. I hear Arcade Fire, Joy Division, Placebo, Barefoot Truth, and a dash of Dave Matthews Band. Some pieces stand out like the more appealing to a mass audience “Do You Wanna’ Be Right, and “Undercover” but there is a deeper and sharper edge to songs like “Walls Have Ears’ and “Anger at its Best”. The strategic interweaving of systemic melody and impressive vocal performances from LaBossiere are a delight, but the solid rhythmical foundation of this band is essential to their artistic and commercial potential. The sound is that of the golden era of popular music in the Eighties and the Nineties when musicianship mattered! But the beauty of this record is the use of all mod-cons forcing Mailman’s Children strong relevance into the modern world. The band should achieve good support from radio and appear to be critical darlings of Manitoba, but I am left bemused how they are not yet a household name. It’s not a case of all the elements being present but the final product being missing as the songs, the musicianship, the production, and the performance all knit together beautifully-even brilliantly. Maybe I’m lucky enough to be in on the ground floor? Maybe things are just about to kick on for these guys? Whatever it is make sure you get hold of this album. Supply and Demand is a must have and in the class of all by itself.

Rating – 8.5/10

Jennifer Hertzler

INDIE ARTISTS ALLIANCE.com

USA

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VENTS MAGAZINE

“Supply & Demand” by The Mailman’s Children

June 13, 2013

From Canada comes Alternative rock band Mailman’s Children who just released their latest EP entitled “Supply and Demand” in 2013. Right from the start it might be easy to just categorize Mailman’s Children as straight ahead pop-rock band, and write them off as the newest trending thing up north. It wouldn’t be wise, though. Sure, if you listen to some of his more catchier tunes within this 6 song line-up that’s the impression you would likely get. However there is a method to their madness. There are some really well crafted, good songs on “Supply and Demand” that step outside the modern pop-rock music boundaries. Mailman’s Children are: Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo Guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vox, Rhythm Guitars). Perreault and LaBossiere both can play the guitar and sing (in the case of Eric) like nobody’s business. All of the above go against the grain of pop and as a result really open up the album. This enhances the listening experience rather than limit it for me. Zeroing in on LaBossiere now he’s obviously experienced at performing, producing and writing music, but it’s how the music is delivered (speaker to ear) that makes Mailman’s Children stand out from other bands. I mean we take a lot for granted between the notes and although some would claim there is nothing here that really that spectacular or fresh sounding, but if you listen to the CD carefully the Devil is in the Details. Perhaps that is why these guys are on our Radar screens in the first place – they make it look easy. Forgive me if I’m talking in circles – but some bands can deliver music that’s pretty straight forward, conservative and painfully simple yet brilliant in scope. Furthermore in lieu of the amazing string of songs these guys deliver on Supply and Demand it almost feels as if Mailman’s Children are really on to something. Supply and Demand is a one of a kind EP from a one of a kind band that’s closely tied to classic blues-rock-soul, but has a more modern alt-rock sound. I hate to pigeonhole but I can hear the Beautiful Girls, Ash Grunwald, Xavier Rudd, John Butler trio and Blue King Brown. Mailman’s Children will please a wide range of musical personalities. Sure it’s possible that future releases will demonstrate more musical molding or identity developing. Many bands start off sounding like another act in a descript way only to develop their trademark sound later. But when Supply and Demand runs its course over one walks away felling Mailman’s Children are on to something special.

Top Tracks: Undercover, Crazy Without It, Walls Have Ears

4.5 out of 5***

By Joseph Crowder

VENTS Magazine

USA

 

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INDIE SHARK.com

The Mailman’s Children - “Supply & Demand”

POSTED on June 13, 2013

Genre:   Alternative Rock, Rock, Punk

Sounds Like:    Brendon Urie, The Young Veins, The Academy is, Metro Station

The Good   Catchy Songs, Solid Indie Vibe

The Bad:   Repetitive Sound

The Ugly:  Nothing to report

The Band:   3 out of 5

The Music:    5 out of 5

The Songs:   5 out of 5

The Vibe:  5 out of 5

The Production: 3 out of 5

The Verdict:  4 out of 5

THE REVIEW:  I recently checked out the 3rd release from Mailman's Children entitled Supply and Demand based out of Canada (Winnipeg, Manitoba).  Most would agree most popular artists out there have something truly special to give to their fans. This goes above the typical attributes like raw talent, amazing songs, nice voice, or even a very marketable look, sound and image. There's something truly infectious at the core of these artists that simply makes us feel good when we listen to them. Whatever "it" is - they all seem to have "it". Venturing to their website I get the impression this is one band extremely determined, dedicated and passionate about the songwriting craft and being in a no holds barred Alternative Rock band from Canada. From start to finish this CD from Mailman’s Children delivers 6 amazing tracks and is a very entertaining musical experience all around. It pushes hard at times and has aggressive Alternative Rock quality to it, and even dabbles in heavy Pop Rock and even Jam Band.  It also reminds me of Brendon Urie, The Young Veins, The Academy is, and Metro Station. I can also hear    Fall Out Boy, Patrick Stump, and Hey Monday.   Any fans of any of these musical styles or bands will enjoy this latest release. It's clearly marketed for those who like a male vocal front and plating that never lets down its guard. I get the impression these guys:  Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo Guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vox, Rhythm Guitars) are really letting it all hang out. In other words they hits the mark remarkably well by just by being who they are musically. Favorite tracks include (Undercover) and (Crazy Without It). All songs strike the perfect balance between rock, alternative rock and in your face messages that don’t sugarcoat the truth. The songwriting is impressive and digs a bit deeper than the next independent band. Within each one of these pieces Eric LaBossiere and the gang capture something special as they bare their soul and delivers what I would call pure musical mojo. It offers much in the way of passion and compelling-thought provoking lyrical content. The playing from all members is spot on and just makes the whole CD even more enjoyable. The vocal abilities (LaBossiere) and the solo guitar playing abilities (Perreault) are to die for. The overall vibe of the production is very defiant, rebellious and a bit comical with pockets of hope shining through. 

THE BOTTOM LINE:  I see Mailman’s Children as a diamond in the rough, with an amazing amount of potential. As time goes by he will no doubt hear more from them. I wouldn’t be surprised to hear her music on the Radio someday or even in a popular Video Game, Reality TV Series or even headlining the Warp Tour.  In close most famous artists out there have "it" I'm not so sure what it but Mailman’s Children have whatever "it" is.

RATING: 4 out of 5 SHARK TEETH

Michael Morrison

Indieshark Music Critic

USA

 

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ROCK N ROLL VIEW

June 12, 2013

Artist: Mailman’s Children

EP: Supply and Demand

Label: Independent Artist

THE MAILMAN’S CHILDREN RELEASE NEW EP

Who doesn’t like music from Canada? However I’d bet not all hands go up in the air. I mean, while one might think rock from Canada music might not be your first and foremost musical choice, most people can get into a good Canadian groove and really enjoy well written music from out brothers up North from time to time. You know bands like: Rush, Aldo Nova, Saga, Bryan Adams, Bare Naked Ladies, etc, etc. Well, keeping this in mind this new release by Mailman’s Children (Winnipeg, Manitoba) entitled interestingly enough Supply and Demand is an exceptional 6 Track EP and is very multi-dimensional to say the least. It also however possesses a Alternative Pop Rock core accessible by all listeners – even by Progressive Rock fans. Does all of this sound a bit over the top to you? Just listen to marquee tracks like Undercover, Do You Wanna Be Right, and Anger At Its Best and you’ll see my perspective. I got hooked on these guys right away after listening to the first few moments of Undercover. Melding a unique yet accessible blend of unearthly guitars, polyrhythmic beats, tasty groove-ridden bass lines and infectious vocal harmonies, the TMC sound is a testament to how they approach music. This band bridges a diverse audience with its distinguishing sonic vision. What’s more the band: Joel Couture (Bass), Joel Perreault (Solo Guitar), Eddie Vesely (Drums), Eric LaBossiere (Vox, Rhythm Guitars) is spot on and delivers syncopated musical synergy that will blow your mind. Kudos goes out to the amazing rhythm section and catchy melodies. The rhythm section is really a big part of their sound. It adds a sort of a classic rock stigma to the disc, I hate to pigeonhole but if you like The Wildflowers, Robbie Williams, Counting Crows, Hootie and the Blowfish, Muse, and even Interpol you will like the music of TMC. While the main focus of this genre of music is generally the instrumental work, that doesn’t mean that the vocals fall behind here. They never feel like an afterthought. Hence the vocal work from LaBossiere brings it all together. These guys manage to move between the mellower sounds and the more rocking ones all the while being undeniably progressive based. All in all it’s a powerful combination that puts a band like TMC on the map for 2013. They should go a long way towards proving that real music is still alive and well. Supply and Demand is an album that I just can’t recommend enough.

Official Rating: 7/10

by Eli Gattis

ROCK N ROLL VIEW

USA

 

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                                           "STRANGER THINGS" Reviews

 

THE MAILMAN’S CHILDREN

"STRANGER THINGS"

INDEPENDENT

FILE UNDER: Pop-Rock with big brains and some serious ambition.

SOUNDS SORTA LIKE: A rockin’ Dave Matthews if he wanted to be in YES instead of the Grateful Dead.

POINTED COMMENTS: There’s nothing illegitimate about Mailman’s Children – these guys are the real deal.  The brainchild of talented singer-songwriter Eric LaBossiere, this quintet displays equal parts inspiration, perspiration and aspiration on its second release Stranger Things. 

LaBossiere’s visionary approach on songs like Confessions of a Dishonest Fisherman and Go is artful and uncompromising, bridging the groovy folk-rock of Dave Matthews Band with the soaring intricacy of prog.  Granted, it’s a pretty tough roe to hoe, but the rest of the band rises to the challenge, operating at a higher degree of musicianship than your typical rockin’ combo and making it clear that Mailman’s Children expect great things for themselves – and of themselves.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5***

Darryl Sterdan, TORONTO SUN/WINNIPEG SUN

Darryl Sterdan is a National writer for SUN MEDIA

CANADA

 

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THE MAILMAN’S CHILDREN

STRANGER THINGS, the album

ON their sophomore album Stranger Things, The Mailman’s Children are beginning to hit their stride.  It’s such a great improvement across the board over their lackluster debut, you have to wonder if it’s the same band.  There is cohesiveness to Stranger Things, each song flowing naturally into the next even as styles, subject matter and mood change.  Reminiscent of the Boomtown Rats, the atmosphere is somewhat stark, and there is a almost a downtown winter bleakness to it, which is tempered quite nicely with a couple of clever tunes about going on a bender (“The Bathroom Floor”) and (“The Confessions of a Dishonest Fisherman”).  The biggest (and best) change is in the band itself and how aware and in sync they are with each other.  “Mustard Fields” best exemplifies this new-found unity as Eric Manaigre’s keyboards provides an intensity to Eric LaBossiere’s self-restrained almost calm vocals.  You can feel the struggle in the song as if it were your own.  In addition to being the principle songwriter, LaBossiere is also a producer (though he has the help from the others), and he handles the job like a seasoned pro.  Details that are all too often overlooked are handled with care and deft precision.  In a Rust Never Sleeps meets Also Sprach Zarathustra manoeuvre, two versions of the rock anthem “La Guillotine” bookend the album, building up to the album and then dramatically concluding it with the same melody.  More than a collection of songs, Stranger Things is a complete album, best enjoyed as a whole. 

4 out of 5****

Broose Tulloch, STYLUS MAGAZINE

(University of Winnipeg)

CANADA

 

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THE MAILMAN’S CHILDREN

"STRANGER THINGS"

SELF-PRODUCED

The Mailman's Children have produced another wonderful CD in Stranger Things. The songs fit together and form a cohesive whole that is a pleasure to listen to.

The group consists of Eric laBossiere (lead vocals and acoustic guitar), Joel Couture (bass), Eric Manaigre (keyboards and vocals), Eddie Vesely (drums) and Joel Perreault (electric guitar and vocals). The CD opens up with "La Guillotine," a largely instrumental piece that is full of grim foreboding.  "Stranger Things" is a moving response when love is gone. The sound of a fishing reel starts off "Confessions of a Dishonest Fisherman," while the tone of the song transforms and adds to the lyrics. The drums take the lead for "Floorboards" and the music that follows is wonderfully sweet.  "Go" is a quiet song of pain, with the music building to support the chorus. The pain lingers in "Mustard Fields," which is also a dark love song. The start of "The Bathroom Floor" does not quite fit in the CD - the music is too fast for the lyrics. But as the song progresses the lyrics. But as the song progresses the lyrics catch up, and then the song clicks. "Thoughtst to End" captures some of the darkness of depression.  "Bruises Cascade" slides up to you and paints a stark picture of a kid growing up. They return to a harsher look at relationships with "When It Gets Cold (live)." The CD then ends with "La Guillotine (extended)," and in this case longer is better. 

"Stranger Things" shows the beauty of darkness. From the first note to the last edge is there, the music and lyrics combining to paint stark and wondrous pictures.

written by Paul De Bruijn

RAMBLES.net

CANADA, published June 7, 2003